Family support prevents LGBT teen suicide

About 94 percent of LGBT youths have had at least one experience in which people said cruel things to them, spit on them, destroyed their property, and threatened or assaulted them—all related to them being gay, according to prior Northwestern research.(Credit: Hasloo Group Production Studio / Shutterstock)

NORTHWESTERN (US) — Family and friends’ support helps counteract bullying and prevent suicide among sexual minority teenagers.

Adolescents most likely to consider killing themselves and engage in self-harm behaviors are those who feel victimized for being gay. About 94 percent of LGBT youths have had at least one experience in which people said cruel things to them, spit on them, destroyed their property, and threatened or assaulted them—all related to them being gay, according to prior Northwestern research.

Suicidal thoughts are a key predictor of a suicide attempt. Cutting behaviors also are a risk factor. Previous studies of LGBT adolescents looked at their risk of making suicide attempts, not predictors that make them vulnerable to it or protect them from it.

“Our research shows how critical it is for these young people to have social support and for schools to have programs to reduce bullying,” says lead author Brian Mustanski, associate professor of medical social sciences. “We believe this will help save young lives.”

For the 2 1/2-year study, 246 Chicago-area sexual minority youths, ages 16 to 20 at enrollment, were interviewed at five time points, six months apart. Most prior research on LGBT populations has been with adults, but Mustanski emphasizes the importance of studying adolescents, since suicide is the third leading cause of death among all youth.

How to offer support

When a child comes out to parents, a good reaction is one of acceptance instead of judgment, notes Mustanski, who is a clinical psychologist.  “This lets teens know their parents are approachable for support and are unconditional in their love,” he says.

An example of an accepting response is, “You are still the same child as you were before you told me, and I love you just the same.”

Parents also should be aware that they play an important role in helping to prevent their child from being bullied and in promoting their child’s mental and physical health. As with all kids, it’s important for parents of gay teens to monitor and teach them about safer sex to avoid HIV/AIDS, Mustanski says.

Mustanski directs Northwestern’s IMPACT program, whose website is a source for youth, their families, and policy makers to learn more about the health and development of LGBT youth.

The site’s content for youth includes engaging videos and games on issues like coming out, having healthy relationships, and dealing with stress and bullying. The IMPACT Program conducts health research and translates the findings into interventions to improve the health of sexual minority people.

The text of this article by Futurity is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivatives License.
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Categories: Gay Teens, Teen Suicide, Young Adult | Tags: , , , , ,

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